Install Theme
holeandcornermagazine:

“No one can win against kipple…”
Join us in the quest to collect kipple, and be part of an ambitious, large-scale artwork for the London Design Festival 2014.
Photographer Dan Tobin Smith wants your help to collect and donate objects to become part of his exhibition The First Law of Kipple. It’s inspired by Science Fiction writer Philip K Dick’s 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (later adapted as the film Blade Runner).
The book describes the fictional concept of ‘kipple’  — all the useless, used-up or pointless stuff that we humans collect around ourselves.
Tobin Smith’s installation will fill an entire floor and mezzanine of his studio with ‘kipple’, carpeting 200-square-metres with a dense, precise, chromatically-themed arrangement of thousands of objects. The installation will be open to visitors throughout the London Design Festival.
Donate your kipple and be part of this remarkable feat.

holeandcornermagazine:

“No one can win against kipple…”

Join us in the quest to collect kipple, and be part of an ambitious, large-scale artwork for the London Design Festival 2014.

Photographer Dan Tobin Smith wants your help to collect and donate objects to become part of his exhibition The First Law of Kipple. It’s inspired by Science Fiction writer Philip K Dick’s 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (later adapted as the film Blade Runner).

The book describes the fictional concept of ‘kipple’  — all the useless, used-up or pointless stuff that we humans collect around ourselves.

Tobin Smith’s installation will fill an entire floor and mezzanine of his studio with ‘kipple’, carpeting 200-square-metres with a dense, precise, chromatically-themed arrangement of thousands of objects. The installation will be open to visitors throughout the London Design Festival.

Donate your kipple and be part of this remarkable feat.

workman:

octobermoonlight:
Quantum Hand by Jason Padgett

workman:

octobermoonlight:

Quantum Hand by Jason Padgett

explore-blog:

Happy birthday, Bertrand Russell! The beloved philosopher’s 10 timeless commandments of teaching, learning and life.

explore-blog:

Happy birthday, Bertrand Russell! The beloved philosopher’s 10 timeless commandments of teaching, learning and life.

cadenced:

Fascinating bicycle towed gypsy caravan trailer produced by Barry Howard Studio and profiled on Tiny House Talk.

The structure of the world was built by the dead, they were paid in wages, and when the wages were spent and they were dead in the ground, what they had made continued to exist, these cities, roads and factories are their calcified bones.

— Nihilist Communism (Monsieur Dupont)

I’d not heard of Nihilist Communism before…

(Source: apofis, via workman)

explore-blog:

There are ten times more cells from microorganisms than human cells in and on our bodies.

Fascinating NPR story on how gut bacteria might guide the workings of our minds, moods, and metabolism. For a deeper look, see The Wild Life of Our Bodies: Predators, Parasites, and Partners That Shape Who We Are Today.

cinephilearchive:

Hayao Miyazaki accidentally gives a perfect description of what it means to be an artist. H/T Ken Ziegler.
Here’s another interesting observation made by Alejandro González Iñárritu:
“I’ve learned that there’s nothing to learn. When I made my first film, ‘Amores Perros,’ I was very concerned about gaining enough knowledge to successfully make a film. Now after completing ‘21 Grams,’ I have learned that I must forget about gaining knowledge, and approach each new project like a complete virgin. Whenever I have tried to draw on previous experiences, the results have not been favorable and I lost valuable time. So now, I erase the slate entirely. That’s not to say I don’t make plans. I believe so strongly  in pre-production and technical preparations. However, once I know that everyone is on the same page as me, technically, I become like an animal — I want only to see and feel and smell the possibilities before me. It’s the most wonderful time because I am totally alive. By erasing all the baggage that comes with past experiences, I can work in the moment to capture the emotions and feelings of my story. I’ve learned not to trust what I’ve learned — only then can I really feel creatively alive.” —In Their Own Words

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephilearchive:

Hayao Miyazaki accidentally gives a perfect description of what it means to be an artist. H/T Ken Ziegler.

Here’s another interesting observation made by Alejandro González Iñárritu:


“I’ve learned that there’s nothing to learn. When I made my first film, ‘Amores Perros,’ I was very concerned about gaining enough knowledge to successfully make a film. Now after completing ‘21 Grams,’ I have learned that I must forget about gaining knowledge, and approach each new project like a complete virgin. Whenever I have tried to draw on previous experiences, the results have not been favorable and I lost valuable time. So now, I erase the slate entirely. That’s not to say I don’t make plans. I believe so strongly  in pre-production and technical preparations. However, once I know that everyone is on the same page as me, technically, I become like an animal — I want only to see and feel and smell the possibilities before me. It’s the most wonderful time because I am totally alive. By erasing all the baggage that comes with past experiences, I can work in the moment to capture the emotions and feelings of my story. I’ve learned not to trust what I’ve learned — only then can I really feel creatively alive.” In Their Own Words

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going: