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Smart thinking…

Smart thinking…

cinephiliabeyond:

Directed by Christian Weisenborn and Erwin Keusch, I Am My Films: A Portrait of Werner Herzog (1978) explores the life and work of contemporary filmmaker. The documentary features extensive interviews with Herzog as he discusses his impoverished childhood and his obsession with filmmaking, which bloomed early. The interview footage is interspersed with clips from some of the director’s many films from the 1960s and 1970s, including some from his first feature film, and his first major commercial and critical success, Signs of Life, which he made using a stolen camera.

Herzog shared his wisdom and experience with a rapt audience at last year’s Locarno Film Festival. Among the many pieces of advice were the following, compiled by Indiewire. See their post for more essential highlights from this fascinating session. —Werner Herzog’s Rogue Film School: Apply & Learn the Art of Guerilla Filmmaking & Lock-Picking
It’s a very dangerous thing to have a video village, a video output. Avoid it. Shut it down. Throw it into the next river. You have an actor, and people that close all staring at the monitor gives a false feeling; that ‘feel good’ feeling of security. It’s always misleading. You have to avoid it.
I always do the slate board; I want to be the last one from the actors on one side and the technical apparatus on the other side. I’m the last one and then things roll. You don’t have to be a dictator.
Never show anyone in a documentary, rushes. They’ll become self-conscious. Never ever do that.
Sometimes it’s good to leave your character alone so no one can predict what is going to happen next. Sometimes these moments are very telling and moving.
Dismiss the culture of complaint you hear everywhere.
You should always try to find a way deep into someone. No one would ever, ever, ever ask—no journalist, no filmmaker would ever ask “Tell me about an encounter with a squirrel.”

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cinephiliabeyond:

Directed by Christian Weisenborn and Erwin Keusch, I Am My Films: A Portrait of Werner Herzog (1978) explores the life and work of contemporary filmmaker. The documentary features extensive interviews with Herzog as he discusses his impoverished childhood and his obsession with filmmaking, which bloomed early. The interview footage is interspersed with clips from some of the director’s many films from the 1960s and 1970s, including some from his first feature film, and his first major commercial and critical success, Signs of Life, which he made using a stolen camera.

Herzog shared his wisdom and experience with a rapt audience at last year’s Locarno Film Festival. Among the many pieces of advice were the following, compiled by Indiewire. See their post for more essential highlights from this fascinating session. Werner Herzog’s Rogue Film School: Apply & Learn the Art of Guerilla Filmmaking & Lock-Picking

  • It’s a very dangerous thing to have a video village, a video output. Avoid it. Shut it down. Throw it into the next river. You have an actor, and people that close all staring at the monitor gives a false feeling; that ‘feel good’ feeling of security. It’s always misleading. You have to avoid it.
  • I always do the slate board; I want to be the last one from the actors on one side and the technical apparatus on the other side. I’m the last one and then things roll. You don’t have to be a dictator.
  • Never show anyone in a documentary, rushes. They’ll become self-conscious. Never ever do that.
  • Sometimes it’s good to leave your character alone so no one can predict what is going to happen next. Sometimes these moments are very telling and moving.
  • Dismiss the culture of complaint you hear everywhere.
  • You should always try to find a way deep into someone. No one would ever, ever, ever ask—no journalist, no filmmaker would ever ask “Tell me about an encounter with a squirrel.”

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Lessons Visual Storytellers Should Follow: Sundance Panels on Audience Building and Filmmaking →

a-bittersweet-life:

image

Whether furthering your passion for cinema through films or content touching upon filmmaking, it is essential for the filmmaker and artist to be open to refreshing ideas and experiences. We are an amalgam of all we encounter, fluid and yet fixed in our humanity. The same applies to creatives….

workman:

ororchideenoire:
Formalized Music / Thought and Mathematics in Composition, Iannis Xenakis (1971).

workman:

ororchideenoire:

Formalized Music / Thought and Mathematics in Composition, Iannis Xenakis (1971).

dkellyphotography:

" mid hudson " hudson river, nyc

dkellyphotography:

" mid hudson " hudson river, nyc

(via workman)

Conflicts 'inside' my iPhone →

mamashayna:

There’s conflict associated with my iPhone5 (beyond which emoticon app to download)?

Yep. 5 million women, men, and kids - yes 5 million - have been killed since 1994 as a result of a civil war in the DRC largely funded by the mineral trade.
And one of the main minerals that goes into…

spring-of-mathematics:

The Poincaré disk model or Poincaré ball model, also called the conformal disk model, is a model of n-dimensional hyperbolic geometry in which the points of the geometry are in an n-dimensional disk, or unit ball, and the straight lines consist of all segments of circles contained within the disk that are orthogonal to the boundary of the disk, plus all diameters of the disk. Along with the Klein model and the Poincaré half-space model, it was proposed by Eugenio Beltrami who used these models to show hyperbolic geometry was equiconsistent with Euclidean geometry.

The Poincaré hyperbolic disk is a two-dimensional space having hyperbolic geometry defined as the disk {x in R^2:|x|<1}, with hyperbolic metric ds^2=(dx^2+dy^2)/((1-x^2-y^2)^2).  The Poincaré disk is a model for hyperbolic geometry in which a line is represented as an arc of a circle whose ends are perpendicular to the disk’s boundary (and diameters are also permitted). Two arcs which do not meet correspond to parallel rays, arcs which meet orthogonally correspond to perpendicular lines, and arcs which meet on the boundary are a pair of limits rays (Figure 1, 2, 3). The illustration above shows a hyperbolic tessellation similar to M. C. Escher’s Circle Limit IV (Heaven and Hell) (Trott 1999, pp. 10 and 83). See more at Poincaré disk on YourMathsolver.

Figure 4: Poincaré ‘ball’ model view of the hyperbolic regular icosahedral honeycomb, {3,5,3}

spring-of-mathematics:

Chaos Theory and Starling Flocks in Nature.

Chaos theory have many applications in meteorology, sociology, physics, engineering,etc…..Also, Chaotic behavior can also be observed in many natural systems. In a scientific context, the word chaos has a slightly different meaning than it does in its general usage as a state of confusion, lacking any order. Chaos, with reference to chaos theory, refers to an apparent lack of order in a system that nevertheless obeys particular laws or rules. Chaotic behavior can be studied through analysis of a chaotic mathematical model, or through analytical techniques such as recurrence plots and Poincaré maps.

Starling flocks in Nature: When the starlings changes direction, speed, each of the other birds in the flock responds to the change and they do so nearly simultaneously regardless of the size of the flock.  In essence, information moves across the flock very quickly and with nearly no degradation. The researchers describe it as a high signal-to-noise ratio. The starlings are capable of extraordinary collective responses. These masses of birds move so synchronously, swiftly, and gracefully. (Shared from the article by Andrea Alfano)
The flock’ s movement is based on evasive maneuvers. There is safety in numbers, so the individual starlings do not scatter, but rather are able to move as an intelligent cloud, fainting away from a diving raptor, thousands of birds changing direction almost simultaneously and move in union. See more at: The incredible science behind starling murmurations by Jaymi Heimbuch & A Darwinian Dance by Grainger Hunt.


Image & Source: I shared at Fig.1:Logistic map  - Fig.2: Wildlife by Alan MacKenzie Photography - Fig.3: Murmurations.

Fig.4: Bifurcation diagram of the logistic map. Logistic systems bifurcate as their rates of change increase. - Fig.5: A Darwinian Dance - Fig.6: Starling, United Kingdom by John O Neill. Fig.7: Starling Murmuration by midlander1231 on Flickr.