Install Theme
maihudson:

socks-studio:
Franka Hörnschemeyer, Relais, 2007
“ Franka Hörnschemeyer, who lives and works in Berlin, focuses her work on a multifaceted approach to redefining spatial conditions. As she explains, “To me a space represents a construction made up of social, historical, and psychological relationships that are constantly in an interplay with people. I examine these relationships and reorganize them.” As a rule, Hörnschemeyer’s special constructions are developed site-specifically, challenging the viewer to explore them through movement…. These prints, in form of layouts, allow us to understand the transparency of special systems, which run through the construction like labyrinths. “ →

maihudson:

socks-studio:

Franka Hörnschemeyer, Relais, 2007

“ Franka Hörnschemeyer, who lives and works in Berlin, focuses her work on a multifaceted approach to redefining spatial conditions. As she explains, “To me a space represents a construction made up of social, historical, and psychological relationships that are constantly in an interplay with people. I examine these relationships and reorganize them.” As a rule, Hörnschemeyer’s special constructions are developed site-specifically, challenging the viewer to explore them through movement…. These prints, in form of layouts, allow us to understand the transparency of special systems, which run through the construction like labyrinths. “ 

Smart thinking…

Smart thinking…

cinephiliabeyond:

Directed by Christian Weisenborn and Erwin Keusch, I Am My Films: A Portrait of Werner Herzog (1978) explores the life and work of contemporary filmmaker. The documentary features extensive interviews with Herzog as he discusses his impoverished childhood and his obsession with filmmaking, which bloomed early. The interview footage is interspersed with clips from some of the director’s many films from the 1960s and 1970s, including some from his first feature film, and his first major commercial and critical success, Signs of Life, which he made using a stolen camera.

Herzog shared his wisdom and experience with a rapt audience at last year’s Locarno Film Festival. Among the many pieces of advice were the following, compiled by Indiewire. See their post for more essential highlights from this fascinating session. —Werner Herzog’s Rogue Film School: Apply & Learn the Art of Guerilla Filmmaking & Lock-Picking
It’s a very dangerous thing to have a video village, a video output. Avoid it. Shut it down. Throw it into the next river. You have an actor, and people that close all staring at the monitor gives a false feeling; that ‘feel good’ feeling of security. It’s always misleading. You have to avoid it.
I always do the slate board; I want to be the last one from the actors on one side and the technical apparatus on the other side. I’m the last one and then things roll. You don’t have to be a dictator.
Never show anyone in a documentary, rushes. They’ll become self-conscious. Never ever do that.
Sometimes it’s good to leave your character alone so no one can predict what is going to happen next. Sometimes these moments are very telling and moving.
Dismiss the culture of complaint you hear everywhere.
You should always try to find a way deep into someone. No one would ever, ever, ever ask—no journalist, no filmmaker would ever ask “Tell me about an encounter with a squirrel.”

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

Directed by Christian Weisenborn and Erwin Keusch, I Am My Films: A Portrait of Werner Herzog (1978) explores the life and work of contemporary filmmaker. The documentary features extensive interviews with Herzog as he discusses his impoverished childhood and his obsession with filmmaking, which bloomed early. The interview footage is interspersed with clips from some of the director’s many films from the 1960s and 1970s, including some from his first feature film, and his first major commercial and critical success, Signs of Life, which he made using a stolen camera.

Herzog shared his wisdom and experience with a rapt audience at last year’s Locarno Film Festival. Among the many pieces of advice were the following, compiled by Indiewire. See their post for more essential highlights from this fascinating session. Werner Herzog’s Rogue Film School: Apply & Learn the Art of Guerilla Filmmaking & Lock-Picking

  • It’s a very dangerous thing to have a video village, a video output. Avoid it. Shut it down. Throw it into the next river. You have an actor, and people that close all staring at the monitor gives a false feeling; that ‘feel good’ feeling of security. It’s always misleading. You have to avoid it.
  • I always do the slate board; I want to be the last one from the actors on one side and the technical apparatus on the other side. I’m the last one and then things roll. You don’t have to be a dictator.
  • Never show anyone in a documentary, rushes. They’ll become self-conscious. Never ever do that.
  • Sometimes it’s good to leave your character alone so no one can predict what is going to happen next. Sometimes these moments are very telling and moving.
  • Dismiss the culture of complaint you hear everywhere.
  • You should always try to find a way deep into someone. No one would ever, ever, ever ask—no journalist, no filmmaker would ever ask “Tell me about an encounter with a squirrel.”

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Lessons Visual Storytellers Should Follow: Sundance Panels on Audience Building and Filmmaking →

a-bittersweet-life:

image

Whether furthering your passion for cinema through films or content touching upon filmmaking, it is essential for the filmmaker and artist to be open to refreshing ideas and experiences. We are an amalgam of all we encounter, fluid and yet fixed in our humanity. The same applies to creatives….

workman:

ororchideenoire:
Formalized Music / Thought and Mathematics in Composition, Iannis Xenakis (1971).

workman:

ororchideenoire:

Formalized Music / Thought and Mathematics in Composition, Iannis Xenakis (1971).

dkellyphotography:

" mid hudson " hudson river, nyc

dkellyphotography:

" mid hudson " hudson river, nyc

(via workman)

Conflicts 'inside' my iPhone →

mamashayna:

There’s conflict associated with my iPhone5 (beyond which emoticon app to download)?

Yep. 5 million women, men, and kids - yes 5 million - have been killed since 1994 as a result of a civil war in the DRC largely funded by the mineral trade.
And one of the main minerals that goes into…

spring-of-mathematics:

The Poincaré disk model or Poincaré ball model, also called the conformal disk model, is a model of n-dimensional hyperbolic geometry in which the points of the geometry are in an n-dimensional disk, or unit ball, and the straight lines consist of all segments of circles contained within the disk that are orthogonal to the boundary of the disk, plus all diameters of the disk. Along with the Klein model and the Poincaré half-space model, it was proposed by Eugenio Beltrami who used these models to show hyperbolic geometry was equiconsistent with Euclidean geometry.

The Poincaré hyperbolic disk is a two-dimensional space having hyperbolic geometry defined as the disk {x in R^2:|x|<1}, with hyperbolic metric ds^2=(dx^2+dy^2)/((1-x^2-y^2)^2).  The Poincaré disk is a model for hyperbolic geometry in which a line is represented as an arc of a circle whose ends are perpendicular to the disk’s boundary (and diameters are also permitted). Two arcs which do not meet correspond to parallel rays, arcs which meet orthogonally correspond to perpendicular lines, and arcs which meet on the boundary are a pair of limits rays (Figure 1, 2, 3). The illustration above shows a hyperbolic tessellation similar to M. C. Escher’s Circle Limit IV (Heaven and Hell) (Trott 1999, pp. 10 and 83). See more at Poincaré disk on YourMathsolver.

Figure 4: Poincaré ‘ball’ model view of the hyperbolic regular icosahedral honeycomb, {3,5,3}